Thursday, October 27, 2011

 

mezzie's back!

All right, so it's been freaking forever since I last posted on this blog, and it's time to get up off my ass and start writing again.

Pan-Ams are on right now, and there's been a great live stream going on here:

http://deportesus.terra.com/road-to-2012/2011-pan-american-guadalajara/live/5/#5

Fantastic camera angles, well-timed editing, a joy to watch. US take note on how to present a meet!

I'm not going to talk about the performances of the American lifters, since it's been hashed over ad nauseum on multiple places on the Internet, so I'd rather not contribute to the cacophony. Instead, I'll just point out that World's are a couple weeks away, so there's simply no reason to expect any of the athletes participating in World's to be peaking for this meet.


My own training has been sporadic, but I'm enjoying it as always. Both my shoulders are finally healthy, so I've been snatching and jerking again, up to around 80/100 on a fairly regular basis, and cleaning up to 110. Life has been busy as always, so I try to train whenever possible.


One fun thing I tried out while my shoulders were rehabbing was sumo deadlifts. With a conventional deadlift max of 150'ish and difficulty pulling more than 140 on any given day, I was able to ramp up my sumo max to 170 in just a few workouts, pulled 150x6 and 140x10.


Here's a vid:



I've also put together a bunch of tutorial material over the past few months, including a vid illustrating pulling the bar to the same height on every lift, rather than starting off by powering things and slowly receiving the bar lower and lower. I find that I'm simply incapable of the adjustment required to speed up under the bar if I start my warmups off by floating under it. Here's what I'm talking about:

Snatch



Clean


Finally, here's a little teaser of an announcement I'll be coming out with in a few short weeks (no, I'm not going into porn, sorry!).



Stay strong and train hard,


mezzie
If anyone out there is interested in seeing what I might be able to offer you, in programming, technique critique, or anything training-related, just email me at traintherightway@gmail.com

Monday, August 30, 2010

 

Client update - 1st Oly meet report

A bit of background
Mark approached me through my blog, wanting to learn explosive lifting to improve his vertical leap for basketball. He wasn't really considering competing at the time, but great to love the lifts and decided on his own to enter a local competition.

I worked with him steadily from December through May, learning technique from the ground up, since he had been self-taught and very raw. He also had flexibility issues in the low positions on both lifts and also squats, which we've gradually improved.

He started off missing 52kg in his first workout on snatch, and over 4 cycles ranging in length from 4-8 weeks, we slowly improved through May, ending up with a PR snatch of 85, and a PR C+J of 105, though he cleaned up to 111.

We were planning on 78/82/85, 100/105/108 or something similar for the meet, but due to fatigue and killer heat, he smartly decided to lower his openers to 75/95 to maintain confidence.

I'll let him take over now, in his own words, now that I have his permission to post this. He's describing his experience at the meet lifting with his friend James:

------------
Hey!!

So I spend most of the day at my first competition and man was it AWESOME! The event, the people, the atmosphere...everything was way better than I imagined!

Arriving
This was our first time in this kind of training facility. On the way there James told me that this place was very legit and some really good lifters trained there. We arrived waayyy to early so the only people there were the main coach (John Thrush) and a few lifters (David Rief: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QT4nKNXMuKc and this other girl). It was so crazy to see oly lifters like them cuz honestly James and I are the only two people who ever see in person do oly lifts right at the gym at UW. Coach Thrush approached us and was very friendly. He was intrigued that we were never officially coached and was curious to see how we would do :-)

James (Mark's friend) lifting
I could tell he was a bit nervous warming up and wasn't so sure he'd make his first attempt. He weighed in at like 67kg I think. He opened up with 61 and I'm not gonna lie, it was one of the most bizarre/scary/amazing lifts I've seen haha! He caught it and started leaning forward to the point where it almost looked like his torso was parallel to the ground while his legs and arms were vertical! He somehow managed to save the lift too! His second attempt (63kg) was much better and his third (66kg) looked great and he had it, but he let it slip behind him when he was standing up.

He looked more confident in his CJ's. Open with 74kg I think and had really no problems at all. Second attempt of 78kg was just as solid. His third attempt (81kg which would have been like a +2kg PR) was a bit too heavy and he couldn't jerk it. Overall, he did so awesome and his success pumped me up even more!

My lifts
Honestly I had high hopes of just killing it, but a terrible night's sleep made me reconsider my goals haha! By the time I was up to lift (like 4 hours after James went because there were soooo many female competitors!) it was scorching in the gym! It got up to 94 degrees at one point! Anyways, I weighed in at 80.1kg and told them my first attempts would be 75kg and 95kg (just to be safe cuz I really wanted to hit my first lifts and I was feeling way too tired).

Warming up I felt fine...missed a few reps in front but I was sure I'd be ok when it came time to go up. Honestly I was not nervous at all. I put up all the vids so you can see what happened on each one :-) I probably could've done 80kg, maybe 82kg if I had a better night's sleep. As for the 107kg...UGH I had it. It's funny but it looks eerily similar to your miss of 106kg in your last meet...coincidence?

Overall Impressions
I loved every second of the meet! Everyone was sooo nice. People I didn't even talk to were cheering me on and that made all the difference. After my 78kg snatch, coach Thrush told me he wanted to talk to me after the meet!!! I was so excited but unfortunately I had to leave before it ended (I really had no choice) so I never got to hear what he was going to say :-( I'll email him though so hopefully he'll tell me then! Who knows...maybe he wants to train me!? HAHA just joking.

Anyways, I had a great time and cannot wait for my next meet, which should be in September or October in the same place.

And one more thing... I really would have NEVER got to this point this fast without your awesome help!! Seriously, you have done way more than I ever could have asked for! You're the man :-)

Thanks!!
Mark
----------

Of course Mark did all the work and deserves all the credit for a great meet, but more importantly for making a TON of progress towards his goals. Here's a recent quote from an email he sent me when I asked how his vertical training was going, as he progressed from hand just above the rim to actual full-on dunking:

"Also, just a little side note...so I went to play bball today (keep in mind that I was still sore from Friday) and I tried jumping to see where my vert was at. It was the best it's ever been!! So far I must have gained like 1- 1 1/2 inches since starting the program! I got like 2 inches below my wrist above the rim!"

"As for my vert...man oh man is it coming along!! And very honestly, I have done NO plyo work. I really want to but I'm super limited when it comes to time working out so I just skip them. However, like today for example, my dunks are getting easier and easier. Unfortunately I took videos when I was too tired so my "dunks" weren't really dunks, more like layups grabbing the rim. I really like the idea of measuring and keeping track of the vert. I know that was my initial goal, and of course that's always really important, but I LOVE oly lifting and just getting better at the lifts themselves and putting up bigger and bigger numbers is so satisfying in and of itself.

The best part of the lifting is that my overall game for bball has gotten so much better! I'm so much more confident driving the ball to the hoop. The best part is my quickness is wicked now!! No joke, I've never been able to beat guys off my first step before like I do now."

Another quote

"-Just an update on my vertical...so I played some hoop before this last workout and finally was able to throw down some legitimate, solid dunks!! I must have added another inch or two since last I checked! Funny thing is that I have hardly played any bball or done plyometrics like I had planned."

NOTE: Since he wanted to keep benching through his Oly training, I kept it in the program for him, but really limited it. Once a week, varying the sets/reps depending on what else he was doing, and he managed to put 25 more lbs on his bench max during all this, too.

Here's the vid from his meet, following by a few comments:




Not too much to say about the lifts. The snatches got better and better. First attempt the adrenalin must have caused him to lose his focus and really swing the bar, but I thought that dropping the bar behind himself on the "down" signal was cool smile

He reined things in much nicer on the 2nd and 3rd attempts. Obviously still not perfect, but much closer to his form in training on his top weights (a few weeks prior to the meet he hit 81 for 3 straightforward singles, and wasn't missing anything 78 or over for a long time).

You can see he has tons of explosiveness on cleans (and jerks), but lacks the leg strength to finish the lift strong and take full advantage of his power. Before he started with me he was doing "parallel" squats both front and back. His very high and shaky front squat 1RM had been 225lbs. It's now a nice, deep 275lbs. Back squat has shown similar improvement. He's definitely got the power to be cleaning 120 now, so hopefully the legs'll catch up soon so he has the confidence to attack it.


If anyone out there is interested in seeing what I might be able to offer you, in programming, technique critique, or anything training-related, just email me at
traintherightway@gmail.com

Tuesday, June 22, 2010

 

Weightlifting Epiphanies interviews!

If you haven't already, you MUST drop by the Weightlifting Epiphanies blog to watch the video interviews filmed by Barry over the past little while. They provide an excellent and detailed insight into the training going on at California Strength with Glenn Pendlay and his athletes (including Donny Shankle, Max Aita, Caleb Ward, Jon North, Jo Ann Arnold, etc), and at Average Broz with John Broz and his athletes (including Pat Mendes, Rob Adell, etc.).

Along with the recent 211 clean and jerk by Kendrick Farris, and a 218 clean, some exciting things are certainly happening in the US. Here's Kendrick in action:

211 Clean + Jerk


218 (!) Clean, missed Jerk


One interesting thing about all the recent information pouring out of various quarters (including the ever-contentious back-and-forth on the goheavy.com Olympic weightlifting forum) is that it has revealed that wildly different programming can lead to similar results. Coach Broz, on various forums and Q&A sessions, has repeatedly said things like "This is the only way to train to become a champion", referring to 2-3 times a day, 6-7 days a week training focusing on JUST the lifts and back squats, without any planned cycling, training to max as often as possible.

On the other hand, when Kendrick's program was posted on the goheavy forum, it was shown that the cycle was divided into different phases, with each phase dedicated to different rep ranges, moving from 10's, to 5's, to 3's, and so on over the weeks and months. A wide variety of assistance exercises are employed, and everything is geared towards peaking for a meet. This is a RADICALLY different approach to cycling, intensity, and exercise selection, yet somehow or another Kendrick still managed to become a world-class lifter, approaching world record weights.

My own feeling is that the ATHLETE is a far more important variable than the specific program they are on. With the right genetics, drive to succeed, and of course the right coach to guide the athlete, the details of the programming are secondary, while the dedication and actual work completed are key.

I'll let you draw your own conclusions, though :)


If anyone out there is interested in seeing what I might be able to offer you, in programming, technique critique, or anything training-related, just email me at
traintherightway@gmail.com

Wednesday, June 16, 2010

 

Hopping mad

I've spent the past few weeks focusing on cleans to the exclusion of pretty much everything else. My right shoulder hurts when I lift my arm up, so no snatches or jerks for a while. In the meantime, I've been cleaning near-max weights every workout, 3 times a week, and have reaped the benefits of specialization, setting 2 clean PR's in the process:



Now, one thing that's immediately striking is that my bar path and positions are solid up to 108, but with 113 and 115, I kick the bar out and hop forward to save the lift. This has been a common theme on the heavier weights. I used to do it on everything over 100, then straightened things out up to 105, and now can pretty much handle weights up to 110 without the "hop". To fix it, I need to be more patient, let the bar come into me more, and then KEEP it close, without letting it kick out at all. A straighter, cleaner pull leads to a MUCH easier clean recovery, since you are more balanced and don't need to compensate for a skewed center of gravity. An easier clean recovery leads to more pop on the jerk, which leads to fewer misses.

So, it looks like now I need to simply get a lot stronger, and 120 will fall, too :)

Thanks for stopping by!

If anyone out there is interested in seeing what I might be able to offer you, in programming, technique critique, or anything training-related, just email me at
traintherightway@gmail.com

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

 

Training Update

Not too much to report, but I wanted to update my blog with a couple of new PR's, and talk a bit about my recent training strategy.

I've been having right shoulder issues for a few weeks (non-lifting related), so haven't been able to snatch or jerk, since the overhead position hurts and feels very unstable. Hopefully it won't be too much longer, but in the meantime, I've gone to a VERY bare-bones approach to training, which has resulted in 2 new PR's.

The training has basically been 3 times a week, cleans at every session, then either clean-grip deadlifts or front squats. I usually work up to a max single on cleans, then if I have time, drop the weight a bit and do some volume work (3-5 more singles at a working weight). Then I'll do the same for either deads or fronties.

A sampling of a few of my recent workouts (with vids):

--------------------

May 21, 2010
Had a frustrating-yet-satisfying workout today. Frustrating because I missed cleaning 110 a couple of times and had my workout interrupted in the middle when I was attempting the max cleans. After unloading groceries and small humans, I couldn't get the mojo back and it just wasn't the same.

Still, I pulled things together and decided to shoot for the elusive 150 deadlift again, and made it today, for a nice PR

Cleans
50x2
50x2
70x2
80x2
90x1
100x1
110x0
110x0
100x0
100x1
105x0
- The misses at 110 were high pulls, not real attempts, sadly. The 105 was just slowness, and the miss @100 was sloppiness after running up and down the stairs 4 times and losing my focus

Clean Pulls
120x2

Clean-Grip Deadlift
120x5
140x1
150x1 - PR



--------------------

May 28, 2010
Cleans
50x2
50x2
74x2
84x2
94x1
100x1
106x1
110x1 (finally!)
112x1 - PR
- I've developed a little hop forward on my cleans at weights over about 107.
Front Squats
100x2
100x2
100x2
100x2
100x2
100x2
- these got stronger and stronger from set to set



--------------------

May 31, 2010

Cleans
50x2
50x2
70x2
85x2
97x1
103x1
110x0 (out front a bit)
110x1 (nice adjustment)
113x0 (high pull, oh well, first time ever attempting so much weight)
106x1
106x1
106x1
- I'm very pleased with how well the 106's went. It feels like a "working weight" now, which is insane considering how recently it felt like a ton of bricks...

Clean-Grip Deadlift
130x3



--------------------

My goals going forward are to work in the 106-110 range on a more regular basis on cleans, and make 110 an "any day" weight. Also of course I'd like to start snatching and jerking again, but will take that one day at a time!


If anyone out there is interested in seeing what I might be able to offer you, in programming, technique critique, or anything training-related, just email me at traintherightway@gmail.com

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

 
With my schedule as hectic as it has been, I've resolved to train at least 3 days a week, for about 30 minutes each workout. This means exercise selection is important, and volume can't be too high. Since the most important thing for me (and most people) is leg strength, I'm going to concentrate on front squats to rebuild that, and cleans to train power. When I have a chance, I'll stick in some snatches and jerks, but for the most part, it'll be a ton of fronties and cleans for the foreseeable future.

My latest workout
Yesterday I warmed up with some light back and front squats to get the blood flowing, then did the following:

Cleans
50x3, 50x3, 50x3
60x2
70x2
80x2
85x2
90x1
94x1
98x1
102x1

Front Squats
96x2
96x2
96x2
96x2
96x2
96x2

I started with front squats last week @90kg for 6 doubles, and have been adding 2kg every workout. I'll keep doing that until I hit a wall, and then switch things up a bit, maxing out and dropping the weight a bit on volume work. Here's hoping training will be fun again soon :)




If anyone out there is interested in seeing what I might be able to offer you, in programming, technique critique, or anything training-related, just email me at
traintherightway@gmail.com

Friday, March 26, 2010

 

Pull as high as you can? No, pull high ENOUGH

When cleaning a heavy weight, should the lifter be focusing all of their energy on pulling the weight as high as possible? I believe that all else being equal, the answer is a resounding NO. Whether you're doing powercleans or squat cleans, the goal should be to make every rep identical to the last, which means pulling the bar TO THE EXACT SAME HEIGHT on every rep.

This idea may seem counter-intuitive to some, since you'd think "the lighter the weight, the higher I pull it". That's true only if your focus is on getting the bar UP. Instead, if you focus on getting the bar to your rack position in a full squat, lots of good things happen:

1. You're not letting the bar crash on you
2. You're not "riding the bar down", wasting valuable leg strength
3. You're able to "catch the bounce" at the bottom with maximum efficiency
4. All your reps feel the same as you warm up, so nothing changes when you hit heavy weights

After you explode, think about whipping the elbows with lightning-fast speed and ACTIVELY racking the bar on your "shelf". Don't let the bar fly up or out. Bring it into you, keep it close to the body all the way up, and turn it over FAST and SMOOTHLY.

Here's a demonstration, starting with the empty bar and working up to 100:



Of course there are lots of little things I can do to improve, and I'm always working on it, but the general point should be clear.

Just another little tip to help you on the road to improving your Olympic lifting form...

~mezzie

If anyone out there is interested in seeing what I might be able to offer you, in programming, technique critique, or anything training-related, just email me at
traintherightway@gmail.com

Tuesday, March 23, 2010

 

Workout Log - March 23, 2010 - Snatch, Clean, Clean-Grip Deadlift

Snatched today for the first time in a month, and things felt OK. It was nice to have some moderate weight locked out overhead; I'm looking forward to wonky shoulders over the next few days! Worked up easily to 70 for a couple of singles without any misses, and felt fast enough, though my pull wasn't terribly explosive. I'll chalk it up to rust.

Kept 70 on the bar and did some powercleans and front squats to warm up for cleans, and kept on going. I was planning to work up to 90 for a couple of singles, but 90 felt good, so I slapped 95 on the bar and did a nice single there.

Just kept adding weight to the bar for some clean-grip deads, and then was done in 35 minutes flat.

Snatch
40x2, 40x2, 40x2
50x2, 50x2, 50x2
60x1, 60x1
65x1, 65x1
70x1, 70x1

Powerclean + Front Squat (to warm up for cleans without stripping the bar after snatches)
70 x 1 + 3, 70 x 1 + 3, 70 x 1 + 3

Clean
80x2, 80x2
85x1
90x1
95x1

Clean-grip Deadlift
100x5
110x3
120x2
130x1




If anyone out there is interested in seeing what I might be able to offer you, in programming, technique critique, or anything training-related, just email me at
traintherightway@gmail.com

Labels: , , ,


Friday, March 19, 2010

 

Iron Gym Workout Bar review

With things remaining busy around these parts, training has taken a back seat to other priorities. However, I did promise to report on the Iron Gym Total Upper Body Workout Bar - Extreme Edition I invested in a couple of weeks ago, and I must say, I absolutely LOVE it!

I decided to practice Pavel Tsatsouline's "Grease the Groove" protocol, discussed in this article (PDF). The basic idea is to do tons and tons of volume spread out over the day while lifting completely within yourself. With chins, I started off doing sets of 2 and 3 whenever I passed by the bar (conveniently installed in the doorway to my home office). I started with around 30 reps per day, and gradually increased up to 60, with sets of 5 comprising about half the volume, and singles, doubles and triples the rest.

I've even incorporated my Gymboss Interval Timer into the workouts, by timing intervals of 60, 90, 120 or more seconds, and doing a prescribed number of reps every interval for 10, 20, 30 or more minutes. For example, the other day I did doubles every 90 seconds for 30 minutes, for a total of 40 reps. It breaks up the work nicely, and I don't feel fatigued at all. Since I got the bar, I've missed about 2 or 3 days total, and have done at least 25 reps on the remaining days.

The bar also has a pushup feature, which I must say is PERFECT for my leverages. When I was a teenager, I religiously did 50-100 pushups every day, and soon developed shoulder and back issues. Bench pressing, pushups, or any horizontal push motion with my hands in the typical position have always caused me grief. The Iron Gym has a neutral-grip grip area for pushups, allowing a nice, deep motion which is completely pain-free for my shoulders. I've started in slowly, with a couple sets of 10 over the past few days, and am planning to up the volume on those bit by bit, too, perhaps doing half a day of pushups, and half a day of chinups Pavel-style, to keep getting in regular upper body work.

As I was writing this post, I realized I should have taken a video of everything to really hammer home what this thing does. I do EVERYTHING with a neutral grip, but you can do supinated, pronated, wide-grip, regular, or narrow-grip chins, a few pushup variations, and some other stuff that I'll probably never try. I'll put up a proper video review in a few days.

I also finally managed to get myself downstairs to the garage for a proper training session on Wednesday. I did some light powercleans, push presses, and front squats, and it felt great. Even 20-minute workouts here and there are exhilarating, and I have to remind myself and push myself to get training whenever I can squeeze in a workout.



Train hard everyone!


If anyone out there is interested in seeing what I might be able to offer you, in programming, technique critique, or anything training-related, just email me at
traintherightway@gmail.com

Labels: , ,


Tuesday, March 2, 2010

 

Some thoughts on eating

It bears repeating that the majority of my thinking is geared towards the long-term lifter, one who is ready and committed to treating weightlifting (or general strength training) as a life-long endeavor, one who strives to maintain a healthy, strong body, full of energy, enjoying the sport and all it has to offer free from injury until the day they can no longer wrap their hands around the bar.

Many lifters need to cut weight in a short period of time to lift in competition, and so they adopt a short-term strategy for that. Other lifters are very body-image conscious, and try to maintain a very low bodyfat percentage throughout the year (NOT conducive to making strength gains, but that's another story). These are fine and noble goals, but they are not relevant to what I'm going to discuss in this post.

I'm guilty of occasionally ignoring the advice I'm going to give here, but life wouldn't be any fun if we NEVER cheated on our diets. And above all else, a "diet" shouldn't be one of restriction, but rather one that provides the energy needed to fuel our day-to-day activities, including workouts, rich in variety and nutrients, while at the same time providing delightful stimulation to your taste buds. We won't keep eating food we don't like for very long.

All that being said, here are mezzie's rules of healthy eating. First the rules, then some brief elaboration and links.

  1. Eat food that you can digest easily
  2. Eat food that makes you feel energetic
  3. Eat "food"

That's it! Nothing too complicated, nothing about counting calories or figuring out macro or micronutrient content, no food scales, no preaching, no negatives. So why is it so simple? Let's look at the rules one by one:

1. Eat food that you can digest easily
So many young trainees think they need to take lots of supplements, including vast amounts of protein, in order to maximize their gains. Not only is this untrue in general, but if carried to extremes can be quite uncomfortable. Protein powders in general aren't kind to the stomach, and can leave you bloated, gassy, and feeling nauseous or queasy. If you can find a protein powder that your stomach handles well, fantastic, but treat it as a SUPPLEMENT, rather than as your main source of protein. See point 3 below for further information.

Vast quantities of milk, or ANY food or drink for that matter, can lead to intestinal discomfort, diarrhea, and other long, unwanted trips to the bathroom. Do you really think your body is benefiting from all this? The answer is likely no.

2. Eat food that makes you feel energetic
This is a polite way of saying "don't load up on sugar-filled crap all day" or more simply "don't eat food that brings you down". Eating reasonably-sized portions of good quality food (again, see point 3 below) throughout the day, while minimizing plain old junk food or other highly-processed foods, will keep your energy levels consistent and high.

Have you ever had that extra piece of pie for dessert and then regretted it 30 minutes later? Or had that chocolate bar after lunch at work, and then felt like napping by 2PM? Sugar can provide a brief energy boost (so it can be fine in limited quantities post-workout, or better, post-competition!), but the crash that follows just makes you feel lethargic and gross.

3. Eat "food"
Here's the biggie.

I'm a big fan of Michael Pollan, who wrote The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals and In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto. In the latter book, he discussed the cuisines of various countries of the world, and how the foods work synergistically to form a complete way of eating for the people. In the West, scientists have tried to analyze the diets of various non-Western cultures to determine the key ingredient(s) that make it "work". For example, olive oil in Greek cooking, or soy in Japan. Then all of a sudden the Western media brainwashes the people here into believing that those "power foods" are the key to lifelong health and a trim body. Of course, that's not the way these things work. Those ingredients are a tiny part of the cuisine as a whole, and simply contribute to its overall effectiveness.

All that being said, the one thing the major cuisines of the world have in common is that they're composed of REAL FOOD. Nothing that comes in a box, has a shelf life of a Twinkie, is in powder form, and so on. Fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, meats, fish, poultry, various grains, beans, legumes, and on and on. Some cuisines are very high in protein and/or fat, while others may be over 90% carbohydrates. No matter what, the cuisines result in lean, muscular, healthy bodies for the most part. Supplementation is unheard of, Western diseases such as Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and so on simply don't exist.

The take home point? Stick to the outside aisles of the grocery store, and stock up on as much "food" as you can handle :)

With the help of a former bodybuilding champion, I have put together a spreadsheet that can help lifters plan their eating for the long-term, develop great habits that will last a lifetime, and will leave you worry-free if you ever "slip" and go on a little binge, since you'll always have the plan to come back to. The plan does stress protein intake, since it's much easier to build muscle while keeping protein consumption high, but really it's about balance and long-term planning.

Also, with the help of some of my lifters and friends, I'm currently compiling a set of easy, brain-dead recipes that generally take 10-20 minutes to prepare, and are a great addition to the spreadsheet.

So again, see the note below, and happy eating :)

If anyone out there is interested in seeing what I might be able to offer you, in programming, technique critique, or anything training-related, just email me at
traintherightway@gmail.com




This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Subscribe to Posts [Atom]